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// September 01, 2016

Michael attended the photocall of The Light Between Oceans today at the 73rd Venice Film Festival. Photos are still coming out, but I have added over 200 high-quality photos into the gallery! I’ll update when I get more.

Update: Added 176 more photos!


// September 01, 2016

Los Angeles Times – Michael Fassbender tensed up for the briefest instant when the topic of his relationship with Alicia Vikander, both his co-star and his girlfriend, arose.

Then he relaxed and offered a Zen thought. “People will make the presumptions they want to make. If you start to defend anything, it becomes, ‘Methinks the lady doth protest too much,’ ” the actor said, when asked if he thought moviegoers would draw real-life inferences from his work.

“I mean, have you seen ‘Shame?’ ” he quipped, referring to his 2011 portrayal of a sex addict. Vikander, sitting next to him, let loose a sharp laugh.

The pair were side by side at a downtown hotel here recently, polite and formal and trying not to seem like they’re a couple — while trying not to seem like they were trying not to seem like a couple.

Over the course of a conversation, about their new movie “The Light Between Oceans,” they could be professional, even distant. But they also jumped in often to finish each other’s sentences in a manner that reinforced their couplehood — an embodiment of the contradiction that occurs when the modern imperative to stay on message collides with the even more modern reality of everyone knowing everything about everybody.

Since the days of early Hollywood, actors have been falling for each other on set. And for pretty much just as long, we’ve been obsessed with them.

From Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor on “Cleopatra” in the early 1960s, engaging in a moltenly dysfunctional affair, to Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie on “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” in the mid-2000s, also initiating a romance outside one partner’s committed relationship, mid-production hookups have been a regular source of film-fan fascination.

The reason has often had as much to do with us as them: These relationships offer the universal touchstone of the office romance, only more heightened and surreal.

But as it has in so many other areas, the age of social media and rampant exposure has changed the equation. When Jolie and Pitt were first rumored to be together on the “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” set, the idea of an affair broadcast widely using modern media tools was still new. It compelled us for months, right up through when the film landed in theaters.

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// August 30, 2016

Collider: The last few years you’ve been very fortunate. What it’s been like for you being able to work with these such talented actors, talented filmmakers, and be a part of these great projects?

MICHAEL FASSBENDER: It feels good. As an actor, it’s always been good to be working at all, so to be working with this kind of outburst of talent and people that I’ve been working with, yeah, it’s the best.

Jumping into The Light Between the Oceans, one of the things I love about Derek’s work is that he really goes for the emotional honesty in all scenes. Can you talk a little about working with Derek and what he was looking for on set?

FASSBENDER: I think he’s the sort of director that always pushes to find more in the scene. So even if the scene is barely starting forward – maybe three lines, we could run a take without cutting for 30 minutes, trying to sort of discover new things all the time. I mean, as one of the notes for us as actors was to fail to surprise him, so he’s definitely one of those directors that’s very much at the forefront of his mind. You know, when you finish the day, and you finish the scene, you don’t get a chance to go back to it. So you wanna make sure that everything is left on the floor.

I would imagine that you had a lot of choices at that time for projects – what was it about the material that spoke to you to be a part of this?

FASSBENDER: I just read the script, and it just fit me and I sort of found the right emotional place. I felt that it was a really beautiful story. It seemed like it was a story that a lot of people could relate to: a lot of ordinary, decent people trying to sort out life choices, and making a choice that was a bad one but they’re good people and they’re trying to deal with the consequences of that choice. I felt like it was a pretty refreshing story and was told in a respectfully old-fashioned way. You know, we don’t get many of these touching films these days. There’s not a villain and a good guy, there’s just the family—and they’re regular people trying to sort of do the best they can in these circumstances. It’s a beautiful love story as well.

That’s one of the things I wanted to touch on. One of the really refreshing things was for me, there really was no antagonist. It was just a nice change. For me, looking at it from the outside in Hollywood, it’s harder and harder to make these, you know, personal stories. Have you been noticing that as an actor, that getting a script like this is harder and harder?

FASSBENDER: Absolutely, without question.

One of the things I spoke to Derek about yesterday, that really surprised me was that he was editing this for a year. Most filmmakers don’t have that much time to edit. When someone’s editing a project that you’re involved with, how involved do you want to be in the editing room? Or do you sort of say, “just show me when it’s done”?

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// August 28, 2016

Assassin’s Creed is featured in the October 2016 issue of Empire magazine. I have added scans into the gallery.

// August 27, 2016

The Light Between Oceans is featured in the September 02 issue of Entertainment Weekly. I have added scans into the gallery.